Friday, July 31, 2015

Abe’s Guide to Wall Germander

Abe’s Guide to Wall Germander





Providing four-season interest, germander teucrium is an excellent addition to the perennial flower garden. Its bright green, attractive foliage topped of by early summer lavender flowers is a pretty sight in the full sun perennial garden. Germander is useful as a hedge, border plant and groundcover on dry, difficult banks.

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Providing four-season interest, germander teucrium is an excellent addition to the perennial flower garden. Its bright green, attractive foliage topped of by early summer lavender flowers is a pretty sight in the full sun perennial garden. Germander is useful as a hedge, border plant and groundcover on dry, difficult banks.

Abe’s Guide to the Wall Germander is a planting guide for gardeners that wish to grow this beautiful perennial flower successfully. It covers cultural requirements, propagation tips, problems and many other topics related to growing the Germander teucrium.

Written for gardeners by a gardener Abe’s Guide to the Wall Germander relates how to grow this beautiful perennial flower successful. From seed to cuttings to division, learn how to propagate this wonderful full sun perennial plant.

The Chrysanthemum has many varieties available and you will find the most readily obtainable ones listed here. Gardeners will find the included seed catalog list useful.

The Abe’s Guide to the Full Sun Perennial Flower Garden Series contains twenty full sun perennial flowers for the home perennial flower garden. The flower guides have the information the gardener needs to grow the plants successfully. From culture, propagation and best varieties, each guide contains complete information on each plant.

© Mossy Feet Books 2015




Wednesday, July 29, 2015

Wednesday, July 29, 2015 This Week In Abe's Beer Garden - Harvesting the Potatoes

Wednesday, July 29, 2015
Red Potatoes
Red Potatoes
Abe's Beer Garden's Vegetable Patch has been producing vegetables for the table for a few weeks now. So far, we have not had any tomatoes. The wet weather produced a blight, which I have managed to quell, but the early blossoms have fallen off. Several were ripening, then raccoons invaded the garden ruined them. Now I note that they are beginning to pull the green ones from the vines. Unless I find an answer to the raccoon problem, we may not get any tomatoes.
Harvested the Potatoes
Some of the potato vines had died and they were ready to harvest. After digging these, it was apparent that the others would have to be harvested, also. The mice have infested the bed, gnawed some of them, and completely eaten others. So, on Sunday morning I harvested the rest of the potatoes. This diminished the harvest, somewhat, as the Kennebec, reds and the russets would have grown more. But leaving them into the ground would have exposed them to more mouse damage, possibly ruining the crop. So out they came. After digging, I spread them in the tool shed for a few days. I dare not leave them in there long, as they will turn green. Green potatoes are inedible.


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Potatoes From Seed
Only one of the plants I grew from seed grew, and it is still growing well in the garden. It looks like it may bloom soon. I did find a potato berry while I dug, which I saved. I will save the seed from that berry to plant next year. Stay tuned.
Cabbage, Beans and Cucumbers
The cabbage beans and cucumbers have borne well. There are still several heads left to mature. The fall cabbage is planted, as are several other crops for the fall garden. I harvested a test crop of edamame and found it suitable to grow again, so edamame joins parsnip, salsify, rutabaga to my list of new vegetables. The green peppers are beginning to bear. The zucchini has been a disappointment, as the squash form, but do not grow. I have harvested a few, but not many. There is damage to the base of the plants, as well as to the base of the pumpkin, squash and watermelon plants. It looks like a critter of some kind is chewing on the base of the plant, weakening it. The watermelons have died and the pumpkin may follow.
So far, the garden has produced well, with some disappointments. However, with two batches of sauerkraut fermenting and some beets secured in jars in the refrigerator, I cannot complain. We have had plenty of carrots, as well.
To purchase a copy of Abe's Guide to the Potato, click this link.
http://abesbeergarden.blogspot.com/2015/05/abes-guide-to-growing-potato-growing.html

Friday, July 24, 2015

Abe's Guide To The Iris




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The bearded iris is one of the most dependable perennial flowers in the perennial garden. Adaptable to a wide range of soils and hardy over a wide geographic range the iris will fill the late spring garden with its flowering beauty.

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Abe’s Guide to the Bearded Iris is a planting guide for gardeners that wish to grow iris flowers successfully. It covers cultural requirements, propagation tips, problems and many other topics related to growing the bearded iris.

Written for gardeners by a gardener Abe’s Guide to the Bearded Iris relates how to grow hemerocallis successfully. From seed to division, learn how to propagate this wonderful full sun perennial plant.

Bearded iris has many varieties available and you will find the most readily obtainable ones listed here. Gardeners will find the included seed catalog list useful in locating daylily seeds.

The Abe’s Guide to the Full Sun Perennial Flower Garden Series contains twenty full sun perennial flowers for the home perennial flower garden. The flower guides have the information the gardener needs to grow the plants successfully. From culture, propagation and best varieties, each guide contains complete information on each plant.

© Mossy Feet Books 2015



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Thursday, July 23, 2015

Abe's Guide to Growing Cabbage





Cabbage is one of the mainstays of the vegetable garden. Served raw, fermented, pickled or cooked, cabbage is delicious and offers up an impressive array of nutrients and fiber Abe’s Guide to Growing Cabbage is an excellent vegetable garden guide for the garden beginner as well as the veteran gardener.

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Gardeners will find sections on growing, pickling, fermenting and canning cabbage. Planting, culture, harvest and storage of cabbage is covered as well.

Abe’s Guide to Growing Cabbage contains a list of seed sources as well. It will please gardeners to find our extensive list of seed catalogs included as well. This updated catalog includes some new seed catalog finds.

The garden vegetable series Abe's Guide to Growing Your Vegetable Garden includes this book. This exciting new series of vegetable gardening books will include twenty vegetables. These are the most common ones grown in the home vegetable garden. The books will all include complete growing, culture, botanical, harvesting and storage information. Great for veteran or beginning gardeners the series is written for gardeners by a gardener.

© Mossy Feet Books 2015



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Wednesday, July 22, 2015

Making Monarda Tea

Monarda - Bee Balm
Monarda - Bee Balm
Making Monarda Tea
Monarda, or Bee Balm, makes a delightful tea to drink on those cold winter days. Making the tea is easy if you have some Bee Balm plants blooming in your garden. The time to make it is now, while the Bee Balm is in bloom.
Attractive to Bees and Hummingbird Moths
Bee Balm acquired its common name because it attracts multitudes of bees. Bumblebees and honeybees flit among its flowers gathering nectar. Butterflies also like the flower as well as the active, interesting hummingbird moth. A warm summer day's visit to a cluster of Bee Balm will reveal a multitude of insects competing for the blossoms.
A Delicious Tea
The flowers and fragrant foliage makes a delightful tea. Many of the native Indian tribes used Bee Balm as a medicine plant. They used it to relieve cold symptoms, a tonic and as a cure for abdominal pains. I like the tea as a nice, hot beverage to enjoy on a cold winter day.
Harvesting Bee Balm
To dry, cut when the blooms are at their peak in the early morning and hang the whole plant upside down in a dry, warm area with good air circulation for a few days. The flowers lend their color, shape and fragrance to dried flower arrangements. To use as a tea, strip the dried blossoms and leaves from the stems. Crush them with the hands or in a blender.
Storage of Monarda Tea
After stripping the flowers and leaves, store in a cool, dry location in a jar with a screw type lid. Alternatively, a plastic re-sealable bag or plastic container with a lid that seals will work.  The dried leaves and flowers should keep for two to three years if kept cool and sealed.
Abe' Guide to Monarda
Abe' Guide to Monarda
To make the tea I just use about one teaspoon of the crushed leaves steeped in a cup of boiling water. Put the dried leaves in a tea infuser and pour the boiling water over them. After steeping the dried leaves for a few minutes, remove the infuser and add the leaves to the compost pile.

Abe's Guide to Monarda
Mossy Feet Books offers a book on Monarda cultivation, harvest and other information about this fascinating plant.

Friday, July 10, 2015

Abe’s Guide to the Fall Garden

Abe’s Guide to the Fall Garden





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Fall can be a productive time of year for the vegetable garden. Many vegetable crops benefit from the cooler temperatures and even thrive in the first frosts of autumn.

The flower garden can benefit from many activities accomplished in the fall. Autumn application of soil amendments, planting of bulbs and division of perennials all benefit the spring garden and all standard fall tasks.

© Mossy Feet Books 2012



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Wednesday, July 8, 2015

07-08-2015 This Week in Abe's Beer Garden


07-08-2015 This Week in Abes Beer Garden

Black Eyed Susan
Black Eyed Susan
Blooming This Week in Abe's Beer Garden
The Blackberry Lilies have joined the crescendo of color. The symphony of color now includes purple coneflower, summer phlox, daylily, hardy geranium and a few leftover blanket flowers. Butterflies, bees and an occasional hummingbird moth busy themselves among the blossoms, gathering nectar and spreading the pollen from flower to flower. The summer bloom season is now at its height in Abe's Beer Garden and will soon begin to decline. Coneflowers will continue for some time, yet but summer phlox and black-eyed Susans will soon run their course. By Labor Day, the giant Hibiscus will alone bear the standard until New England Asters pick up the baton and sprint into fall.



Hummingbird Moth on Monarda
Hummingbird Moth on Monarda
Hummingbird Moth
Hummingbird moths are the most entertaining of the insects to visit the flower garden during the summer months. Several species of these moths inhabit North America. They are all similar in appearance and habit. They truly do bear a remarkable resemblance to their namesake, the hummingbird. They flit and hover around the flowers and first time observers really do think they are hummingbirds. Closer inspection reveals their moth-like appearance. They even make a sound similar to hummingbirds as they flit among the flowers.
In the Beer Garden, these insects prefer the monarda blossoms, but they also hover around the summer phlox. They also like honeysuckle, dogbane and some members of the rose family.
The hummingbird moth feeds on nectar during the daytime hours, unlike most moths that are active at night. The female lays its eggs on the underside of plants that serve as a larval food source. These plants include honeysuckle, hawthorns, viburnum, and Black Cherry trees. Predators of the hummingbird moth include birds, mantis, spiders and bats. After hatching, the caterpillars feed, and then drop to the ground. They spin a cocoon and spend the winter sheltering in leaf litter. By spring, they emerge and begin the whole process again.





Tomato Blossom
Tomato Blossom
This Week in Abe’s Beer Garden Vegetable Patch
The vegetable garden has yet to reach full production. We have consumed the last of the lettuce. It kept quite will for several weeks in the refrigerator. The cucumbers have begun, as well as zucchini. The early green beans are gone, but the pole beans are blooming and will soon produce delicious snap beans for the table. Pinto, great northern, bird's nest beans, as well as the other varieties I will dry to use in winter soups have begun to set beans. These I will allow to dry on the vine and finish them off in the drying area in the tool shed.
The sage was dry, so I took it from the dryer and packed it in a container. I will take it in the kitchen to clean further, then store in a jar in the pantry room. I took the mountain mint down, stripped it off the stems, and spread it in the dryer for further curing. The monarda in the garden was ready to harvest, so I cut it and hung it to dry. Monarda makes a delightful tea to drink on cold winter days. I also picked the last of the peas and spread them to dry in the dryer. There are not many of these, but added to the beans they will contribute to some bracing winter soups and stews.


Fall Vegetable Patch
Fall Vegetable Patch
First of the Fall Vegetables
After pulling the peas, the first of the fall root crops went in the garden. I planted some rutabaga, parsnips and salsify for fall harvest. These joined the potted cabbage, cauliflower and broccoli plants that are nestled among the tomato plants. So the fall garden is now being planted.