Monday, July 7, 2014

Abe‘s Guide to Blackberry Lily - Full Sun Perennial Flower


Abe‘s Guide to Blackberry Lily
Full Sun Perennial Flower











With its leopard spotted flowers and attractive seed heads Blackberry Lily provides three seasons of interest as the flowers appear in July and the seeds develop in the fall, persisting into winter.


Written for gardeners by a gardener Abe’s Guide to the Blackberry Lily relates how to grow this beautiful perennial flower successfully. From seed to division, learn how to propagate this wonderful perennial plant.


Blackberry lily has many varieties available and you will find the most readily obtainable ones listed here.




Available On:
Kindle
Sony
Barnes & Noble
Kobo
Apple
.


Other Books By Author


© Mossy Feet Books 2013

Hummingbird Moth on Bee Balm (Monarda)




Hummingbird Moth on Bee Balm

This Week in Abe's Beer Garden - July 7, 2014


This Week in Abe's Beer Garden
Monday, July 07, 2014



Blooming in the Terrace Garden:
Malva Moschata
Monarda
Daylily
Hardy Geranium
Mini Rose climber
Gaillardia
Coreopsis lanceolata
Coreopsis threadleaf, Zagreb
Hosta
Black Eye Susan
Prairie Coneflower
Mountain Mint
Asi Lily
Liatris

Planted in the greenhouse:
Cabbage
Chinese Cabbage
Radicchio

Planted in the garden
Carrot
Beet
Cucumber
Pole Beans

The Hummingbird Moths are active on the Monarda (Bee Balm)


© Mossy Feet Books 2014


Friday, June 27, 2014

Plant of the Week - Mountain Mint, Pycnanthemum virginianum

Plant of the Week - Mountain Mint

Botanical Name:
Pycnanthemum virginianum
Family:
Lamiaceae - Mint
Sun:
Full sun, part sun
Soil:
Not particular about soil type
Hardiness Zone:
USDA Zone 4 - 8
Propagation:
Seed, cutting
Flower Time - Southern Indiana:
June, July
Plant Height:
Twelve to forty inches
Flower Color:
White

Summer Meadow Wildflower
The snowy white blossoms of the mountain mint have emerged.  Mountain mint is a native American wildflower discovered by French botanist Andre Michaux it in 1790 in Pennsylvania. The common name is misleading, as mountain mint rarely occurs in mountainous areas. It does occur in meadows, along fencerows, shorelines and other wild areas.

A Little About Mountain Mint
Cuttings taken in early summer will root and be ready to plant by fall. The plants are erect with a branched upper stem. The flowers that have flowers in their axils are often whitened. The leaves are narrow; spear shaped and has a minty fragrance. The flower bracts are at the tops of the stem in dense whorls. The plant is useful as an insect repellant. Do not  use in teas because it contains pugelone that can harm the liver. The plant can attract butterflies.

© Mossy Feet Books 2014



This Week in Abe's Beer Garden - June 14 - 23

This Week in Abe's Beer Garden
June 27, 2014
An Online Garden Journal


June 15 - 21

Blooming in the Terrace Garden
In the Terrace Garden
Blooming this week:
Penstemmon
Malva Moschata
Daylily
Clematis Jackmani
Hardy Geranium
Mini Rose climber
Gaillardia
Coreopsis lanceolata
Coreopsis threadleaf, Zagreb
Hosta
Astilbe
Black Eye Susan
Prairie Coneflower
Mountain Mint

In the Vegetable Garden
The lettuce has almost all bolted. I am waiting for it to flower and set seed. I am going to experiment with saving lettuce seed. I planted some carrot and beet seed in the garden that a raccoon promptly scratched up. The cucumbers and pole beans are starting to climb. The cucumbers have small cukes on them. The Parel cabbage is starting to head. All of my broccoli has bolted to flower. Pumpkins and winter squash germinated. Set a cantaloupe plant into the garden.

In the Greenhouse
I transplanted the cabbage, cauliflower and broccoli seedlings. Wanted to plant a second crop but didn't get it done. The raccoon got in the greenhouse and ruined some seedlings. 
© Mossy Feet Books 2014


Friday, June 20, 2014

This Week in Abe's Beer Garden


A Week by Week Garden Journal
June 20, 2014
An Online Garden Journal
In the Terrace Garden
Blooming this week:
Penstemmon
Malva Moschata
Daylily
Clematis Jackmani
Hardy Geranium
Mini Rose climber
Gailardia
Coreopsis lancelata
Coreopsis threadleaf, Zagreb
Hosta
Astilbe
The beginning of the daylily display, which should last until late July to mid August, has begun. The varieties in the Beer Garden grew from seed from a mixture called Parks Economy Mix, available from Park Seed Company. I started these several years ago and don't know if the mix is still available.
The penstemmon is a species called Penstemmon deamii, Deam's Penstemmon. This is a wildflower I found growing in the woods. I took some cuttings and got it started in the garden  where it has been a lovely early summer bloomer ever since. Several hardy geraniums inhabit the Beer Garden. The one blooming now, I forget the variety name; will bloom most of the summer. It is not a constant bloomer; it will bloom like crazy for a while, then rest, and bloom again.

In the Vegetable Garden
The lettuce, which has provided reliable salads for the dinner table since April, is bolting. I am going to experiment with saving my own seed this year. I am building a drying area in the new tool shed to dry herbs, seeds, potatoes, onions and other garden produce. I have some rhubarb and salsify seed in there drying now, harvested last week. The first crop of kohlrabi is about done, with a second and third crop still maturing. The Parel cabbage is heading and the tomato plants have some small blooms. So far, there is no sign of those dastardly squash bugs that devastated my cucumber, zucchini and pumpkin plants last year.

In The Greenhouse
I built a mist bed for taking cuttings. It is just a framework of aluminum tubing supporting a plastic sheet. I have a misting head in the center. I took some bridal wreath spirea and Nikko cuttings. I usually take a few cuttings each day, filling about a flat a week of flower and shrub cuttings.
I transplanted the Brussels sprouts, thyme and tarragon seedlings. The fall cabbage seeds planted last week have germinated and are now residing in the greenhouse, as are the carrot seedlings.

Under the Lights
I am still using the plant lights to germinate seed. This week I planted Oriental poppy, Komanchi platycodon, asparagus and achillea seed.


© Mossy Feet Books 2014


Friday, June 13, 2014

Building the Pea Fence





Peas are a favorite crop to plant in the garden to eat steamed, in salads or fresh out of the pod. Usually the pea vines end up in a tangled mess hanging over the edge of my raised beds. Having determined that it was high time to build a pea trellis I set out to build one.
I like to use materials I have on hand and our ten acres of land has many small saplings that need thinning. Therefore, I determined to use some of these to construct my pea trellis.



Materials:
For one trellis:
Two thirty-six inch long sides
Two twenty inch long braces
Four twenty two inch long green branches
Four three inch long by one-quarter inch lag bolts
Four washers to fit the lag bolts

Tools:
Electric drill
Saw - Reciprocating works best but a handsaw will do
Assorted drill bits from 3/16 inch to 3/8 inch
Assorted spade bits from one in to two inch
Wood Rasp
Workmate or wood vise.
Adjustable end wrench or a socket wrench set

Step 1
First, cut the two sidepieces to thirty-six inches.






Step 2
Cut the two twenty inch braces



Step 3
Choose the size spade bit closest to the diameter of the brace. The bit should be slightly smaller than the branch so the brace fits tight into the side.













Step 4
Measure six inches from the end of each of the sides; place a mark and center punch the holes location. Then drill two holes in each of the side pieces.

Step 5
The holes are ready for insertion of the braces.













Step 6
Using the spade bit pilot hole as a guide drill a 3/16 inch hole through the side.












Step 7
Use a wood rasp to file the ends of the braces to a size that fits tight into the hole.














Step 8
Fit the end of the brace into the hole in the trellis side













Step 9
Secure the brace in the Workmate or vise and slip the end in the hole in the side. Use a mallet or hammer to drive the pieces together. Then, using the drill, drill a 3/16 inch hole, using the pilot hole you drilled earlier as a guide, down into the brace. Make sure you hold the drill straight so the bit goes straight into the brace.












Step 10
Insert a lag bolt into one of the washers and put into the hole. Tighten the lag bolt with the adjustable end wrench or the socket wrench. Repeat this for both braces on both the end pieces.













Step 11
The branches that you use for the vine supports should be about the size of a pencil and green. They need to be green so they are flexible. Choose a bit that is close in size to the branch. The bit should be slightly larger than the branch.













Step 12
Measure three holes in each of the sides about six inches apart, center punch and drill the holes. Insert the branches first in one of the sides. Then, flexing them, insert them in the holes in the other sidepiece.











Step 13
The completed pea trellis. It is rustic enough for my country garden.